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Last Updated on: 01/10/2014

Lean and Enterprise Agile Project Management Bibliography

This is my current reading list on planning and managing development.† The methods described here apply not only to development of software, but also to ongoing software maintenance, design of physical objects, software testing, pharmaceutical research, and so forth. 

This list continues to evolve as I learn more.† If you have a favorite that should be here, drop me a note at: kiberle@kiberle.com.

Level

SW

Non
SW

Resources

Beginner

÷

 

Kanban and Scrum: Making the Most of Both.† Henrik Kniberg and Mattias Skarin.† 2010.† A wonderful little book on how to use Kanban in a small software project.† Lots of diagrams and how-to descriptions.†† It works even if you arenít already familiar with Scrum.† Free e-book at InfoQ.

Beginner

÷

 

Lean from the Trenches: Managing Large-Scale Projects with Kanban.† Henrik Kniberg.† 2011.† A good exploration of agile/Lean/Kanban methods on an actual program consisting of five teams.  Lots of drawings and real-world examples.

Beginner

÷

 

Lean-Agile Software Development: Achieving Enterprise Agility.† Alan Shalloway, Guy Beaver, James Trott. 2010.† If youíre dealing with more than a single team, or Scrum isnít quite working for you, this book is a great starting point.† The authorsí insights into why agile methods work can be very helpful when your chosen method isnít quite working as intended.

Beginner, Intermediate

÷

÷

Kanban: Successful Evolutionary Change for Your Technology Business.† David J. Anderson.† 2010.† A practical book on Kanban for those running software projects or any type of continuing knowledge work or investigation.†† This book leads the reader through implementing a Kanban ďpullĒ system on top of existing processes.†† Anderson also covers more sophisticated concepts such as handling two tiers of requirements and different service classes.†

Intermediate

÷

 

Agile Software Requirements: Lean Requirements Practices for Teams, Programs, and the Enterprise.† Dean Leffingwell. 2011.† Despite the title, this book covers agile planning and management as well as requirements.† The treatment of program and portfolio level planning and release trains is excellent.† The chapter on ďMoving to Agile Portfolio ManagementĒ is a must-read for any large organization.

Intermediate

 

÷

The Mastery of Innovation: A Field Guide to Lean Product Development.† Katherine Radeka.† 2012.† A set of case studies on lean practices adopted by companies across a wide variety of fields.† If youíre interested in seeing what other people actually did, with examples, this is a great book.† Assumes some familiarity with Lean concepts.

Intermediate

÷

÷

Mastering Lean Product Development:† A Practical, Event-Driven Process for Maximizing Speed, Profits, and Quality.† Ron Mascitelli.† 2011.†† This book is primarily aimed at those developing physical products, such as mechanical, chemical, and pharmaceutical products.† A variety of Lean techniques in addition to project planning are discussed, with clear examples.†† The book doesnít address software at all, but large-scale software groups will find that some of the techniques apply at a portfolio level, such as capacity planning.†

Intermediate, Advanced

÷

÷

The Principles of Product Development Flow: Second Generation Lean Product Development. Donald G. Reinertsen. 2009.† This book is the foundation for those who want to truly understand how to maximize their profit by applying the concepts of queuing theory to their workflow.† Anderson, Leffingwell, and Mascitelli all cite this book as one of their sources.† The book is well-organized and full of concrete examples.† It does assume that the reader is competent in algebra, comfortable with graphs, and has a passing acquaintance with introductory statistics, so itís not a quick read.† A must for the serious student.

 

   

Copyright Iberle Consulting Group, Inc. 2013